Haunting

Friday Fiction. http://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/11-october-2013/

 

 

Image

Ghosts of ancient days linger, harkening to words long ago spoken. Poets and philosophers shaped the world then and delivered truths in Epidaurian splendour, extolling creation’s wonders. Restorative treatment for unsupported hearts that questioned our same beginnings. Spirits weep silent tears, unheard by those whose hearts are cold to musings.

With healing touch, new words are formed and man’s ailments find an echo in undiminished souls from theatrical beginnings.

A hush descends and even spectres bow to the new. One voice begins and lyrics swell poetically. No dissonant chords to haunt. Phantoms silenced by poetry, personified in the singer.

18 thoughts on “Haunting”

      1. And you’ve used them beautifully. There’s some great flow and rhythm in the reading here. I know what you’re getting at. I often walk in what were medieval streets and pause to listen to the hubbub and chatter all around me and try to understand that strange English. And sometimes driving on the Roman roads you can see legionaries in the distance.

        Like

  1. Wow… you picked an amazing collection of 100 words, darling. Not a one wasted on monosyllabic nonsense! Very poetic and beautiful.

    Like

      1. Then I am remiss in not giving you a hearty welcome to Friday Fictioneers! I’ve nosed around your blog and wonder how you find time to write with seven children. I’m happy to have you aboard and look forward to reading more from you.

        Like

      2. Thank you. They’re mostly self-sufficient in lots of ways so I do get a fair bit of time to myself for writing. Can’t seem to stop now since I’ve started on WordPress. One or two eyebrows have been raised. Including hubby’s who obviously thinks I’ve gone a bit gaga with the amount of time I’m spending in this lovely place.
        I look forward to the journey. And more prompts. 🙂 x

        Like

  2. Dear Scottishmomus,

    Why, oh why, am I thinking of Harry Lauder now?

    Your soliloquy was masterfully written and performed. You captured the age old persona of the master thespian down through the ages.

    Well done.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    Like

    1. What a beautiful comment. I am thrilled you would put me in company with Harry Lauder.
      Very touched. Thank you.

      Looking at your name I’m thinking Scots or connections?

      Like

  3. Dear Scottishmomus,

    I love to believe that I am Scottish to the core, but my late father journeyed to Scotland fifteen years ago and found that our family jumped back and forth between Scotland and Ireland for the last three-hundred years. Lots of horse thieves and princes in there. I’m Scottish at heart and probably 2/3rds by blood. My father played the bagpipes, which the Irish gave to the Scots as a joke and then were dismayed that the Scots didn’t and haven’t seen the joke. He used to sing us Just a wee Deoch and Doris whenever it was time to go home from visiting friends or relatives.

    I’m blathering on. I’ll stop now.

    I’m very happy to meet you. Please accept my traditional welcome to Friday Fictioneers which goes like this, “Welcome to the party, pal!”. I look forward to reading more of your work every week.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    P.S. Lots of Scots here on the Big Island. They came over to be plantation foremen and many stayed and raised families here.

    Like

    1. A lot of us have our roots in Ireland. Mine on both sides a few grandparents ago. A lot of the Irish came to Scotland during times of hardship to find work and then settled here.Very linked. Still feel the Irish heritage. But Scots born and bred.
      Lovely to meet you.I can hear a Wee Deoch and Doris in my mind now. Singing away to myself.
      And don’t apologise for blethering to me. I’m the biggest blether of them all. Ask anyone.
      That’s why I was amazed I could restrict myself to 100 words! Not something that happens often you’ll find.:)x

      Like

Comments are closed.