On The Edge Of Generalisations

edge-of-cliff

(source)

On the edge of generalisations

Heels attempting grip, curled to mould

Toes hanging over, body backwards

Willing anti-gravity to hold

On the edge of generalisations

Tongue refusing words that will divide

Rearranging syllables pending speech marks

Trying to keep the rational on side

On the edge of generalisations

Dismissing view that plummets dirty depths

Eyes ahead, around, must pivot upwards

Avoiding dizzy drop over the ledge

On the edge of generalisations

The rocks below are sharp and barbed by wire

Sweeping as they do around circumference

Fringing predators are aiming higher

On the edge of generalisations

Must resist the urge to just let go

To answer vitriol of venom’s forked tongue

Perception’s suicide beckons below

On the edge of generalisations

Whistling in the wind at raging crash

Smears and sound bites’ horrid accusations

Watching dignity and dialogue smash

On the edge of generalisations

Heels are hurting, eyes are peeking down

To just let go, return the favour likewise

Demise of due decorum with one sound

On the edge of generalisations

Erosion at the nub of tipping point

Resist the fall, the ledge is holding, mainly

A bitten tongue in cheek will not rejoin

On the edge of generalisations

Aggghhh! Or ahhh! Or ah! must be the choice

Get a grip, engage prehensile foothold

Some balance ere generalisations given voice

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24 thoughts on “On The Edge Of Generalisations”

      1. So I should resist the urge to say Tories are tossers, the press are ‘generally’ liars with a corporate agenda and there are folk on Twitter I’d be tempted to push off a cliff? Got it! Too late on the, ‘this is unadulterated push’, mind you. 😉

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      2. I can think of so many who, if hanging from a cliff edge by their fingernails, I may not stamp on their hands yet likely would not assist. Shameful I know. As to Tories, I’ve often pondered the point as to how anyone would think it a good/moral idea to want to become one…having said that, the far left presently are an appalling, compassionate less bunch, infiltrating the Labour party, also. To see my Labour party as it now is, is frankly awful…there’s me, with the late Michael Foot as my political hero!

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      3. Danger in the extremes, Mike. Each claim to want to hold the centre ground but are so far removed from it. Either that or ‘centre’ has shifted and I never got the memo. Having always been left of centre, I may now be deemed to be ‘an extremist’. My political compass finds none of the UK parties acceptable to follow hence my swing to SNP as a voter, seeing as how Labour divested itself of any credibility here. I’ve resisted joining SNP thus far, preferring to keep my distance from party politics and work for independence as a Yes citizen. I always rather liked Tony Benn. I loved the way he spoke and he reminded me of my dad with his pipe smoking. Tony and Michael may well be birling in their graves. I know my dad will be, at the demise of Labour.

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      4. You know it may sound elitist, and that has never been me, but I sometimes question the value of democracy when the bulk of the population are so poorly educated, uniformed and thus pliable to the evil words of racist extremist power seekers. The lunacy of Brexit, if nothing else has proven that.
        If were to vote tomorrow in an election, I’d go LibDem purely for the common-sense take on Europe. If we really do leave the EU, as seems likely, the withdrawal of our membership could trigger its break-up. Prior to the EU, Western Europe, since history was recorded was at war every decade with terrible consequences. 70 years down the line, Germany, France, UK etc. haven’t been at war. For that alone the EU needs to hold together. Beyond that, our exit will herald a piece by piece economic crash the like of which has never been seen previous…and all because of this silly little island being full of closet racist, racists in denial and thoroughbred racists (on both left and right)…because that is what the poorly educated, uniformed stereotypical ‘Brit’ is, and that is why both Labour and some Tories are running around like headless chickens trying to find what is lost, before it is finally lost. Lunacy.
        I’m with you on the Scottish issue, always have been. I dislike the, ‘we don’t want to be ruled from London’ concept, simply because the geographical situation of the seat government should be irrelevant. Be it Brussel, Paris or Rome bothers me not, it’s how those in the place that governs act and Scotland historically has had a bum deal. Selfishly, and perhaps foolishly, I also would like to see Scottish Independence simply in that it would wipe the smile off the faces of the Little Englanders who these days, more than ever before, think Scotland should be taught a lesson, ‘let them leave’ they say. When left with a UK comprising of a few Welsh plus the counties of a naked, little land of England would rather expose their stupidity.
        Gosh I do rant a bit! As to Benn and Foot…both proper people who, I truly believe, genuinely cared not for themselves, but for others.

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      5. Nothing wrong with a good rant, Mike. Rather fond of them myself! Your comment on democracy reminds me of my home. When the kids were younger, but getting a bit bolshy and wanted to vote on things, I used to tell them that they were confusing our home rules with democracy. That, in fact, our home operated more along the lines of a benevolent dictatorship. ‘What your dad and I say go.’ (If I’m being honest, more me than hubs!)
        I figured that we had their best interests at heart and saw the bigger picture, that we were best placed to determine what was good for them.
        That took a bit of a tumble once they really rebelled and just did their own thing without letting on! The things I’ve discovered since!
        Funnily enough, they now say that our way was best while, at the same time, I’ve mellowed to the extent that they tell me practically everything and know that I will actually listen before offering advice that they are free to take or not.
        All that to say that benevolent dictatorship gave way to democracy when I listened and they informed. Then I informed and they listened. We discussed. The facts were on the table. They were negotiable.
        The unfortunate reality of our political situation is that that does not happen. Those who are actually best informed do not always choose to share truthfully. Instead choosing to peddle whatever suits an agenda.
        The role of disseminating information is so vital and yet abused. People expect lies and so disbelieve even the truth when presented. The informed and uninformed have become jaded and cynical. It’s a monster of power’s own making that may be the downfall of more than just government.
        I worry too that a divided Europe is an unsteady peace. For all its faults and failings, and there are many that have been cited, its benefits have been downplayed to a dangerous extent. Another example of misinformation.
        Democracy’s credibility is certainly taking a real hammering this while back. Top-down democracy, like trickle-down economics, may have had its day.
        I think, in part, we only have ourselves to blame for not taking a more active role in politics. Democracy is done to us rather than us forming the process.
        It scares me how many people don’t give a shit as long as life seems to go their own way. Or how many only bother when they are actually affected personally. What me?! And then base decisions purely on single (often mistaken) factors.
        Nicola will be informing us all soon about what Scotgov’s intentions are re Brexit and market access. The potential for another referendum is more than likely given how UKgov has, thus far, responded to a collaborative approach.
        It’s my hope that it comes to pass, that Scotland will be free from the worst excesses of WM.
        Metaphorically sitting around Scotgov’s smaller kitchen table, chewing the fat and discussing what is good and what is not good is an infinitely preferable option to trickle-down democracy or any benevolent dictatorship. And I have my rebels all at hand. I learned from the best. 😉

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      6. The family analogy is oh so accurate…you should lecture. Once I believed change was a healthy thing generally. Plainly I was wrong. The age factor! This may well apply to a Scots Referendum, it certainly would to any second EU Referendum. Given that the oldies generally wanted out, not giving a shit about the future of youth (me, me, me politics again) I found it most interesting that since June it has been calculated the 120,000 oldies who voted leave are now dead. Leave it a bit longer with more youngsters able to vote, plus the Brexit voters who now see the folly of their ways (I’ve met a good number of them), a victory for Remain would be almost certain next time around…if only time was on our side!

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      7. The age factor is definitely a thing. It’s a pity 16 and 17 year olds were not given the vote in the EU ref as it is their future that is at stake and some of those best informed here are the young ones. 16 and 17 year olds here are allowed to vote in Scottish elections. One of my daughters will be 16 by the time indy2 comes along. Another yesser. My nine year old is champing at the bit! Her school recently had a visit from the local SNP MSP and she was so excited that she was being allowed to ask a question. ‘I know that the Scottish Government are doing their best to help the environment. Can you tell us some of the ways this is being done?’ Exact words, apparently. She just told me again.
        I’ve spoken to a fair few who were No voters, now Yes, but my best friend shocked the hell out of me when she told me that she had been a Yes and a Leave and would vote No next time if Scotland insisted on the route of European membership. Two bottles of wine later and some heated words and we agreed to differ. My lecturing skills were obviously compromised by the wine!
        Time is not on side, no, but it will be very interesting, that’s for sure.

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  1. Not so much beaten into submission as bored into it by persistent lies and mis-truths – I guess that’s how they aim to get us, and, let’s face it, it generally (sorry, couldn’t resist) works. Keep searching for a foothold, Anne-Marie.

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    1. I’m not so much bored by it as absolutely raging. I cannot stand that we’re being taken for mugs and that manipulation and misinformation is an accepted political means of governance. Hanging on in there, Chris, by the skin of my teeth. If feet have teeth. :/

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    1. As a generalisation, :/ it is the imminent victory of tripe over truth, Paul. Doing my utmost to wade through murky waters while not inhaling too deeply. One consolation is that words such as yours and others reassure that what is being perpetrated does not go unquestioned. Is it enough, though? Time, if we have it, will tell.

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  2. It’s definitely something tricky to avoid speaking out in a manner that tears down and divides
    But it’s another level of complicated when you delve into the depths of human intent and heart attitudes towards people, perceptions
    Words are only the tip of the iceberg

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