Nae Fuckin’ Pasaran!

Now, I haven’t seen the movie that’s previewed below but I’ve read about it and I love the idea of some wee guys from Scotland refusing to work on planes that would be instrumental in the suppression of a people. The title of the movie is ‘Nae Pasaran’.

And those guys made the difference by not doing their job. Queer, eh?

I tend to go searching for information when I don’t know what something’s about. So, when I first heard of this film – a couple of years ago – I had to do some research. And you all know how to read so  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nae_Pasaran.

East Kilbride is just up the road from me. I go shopping there. There’s a fab, country hotel where me and my best friend have spa breaks. It’s one of the so-called new towns, created post-war, and has successfully grown to be a thriving commercial and residential community. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Kilbride

I’m in the Cambuslang bit that’s mentioned. Once the largest mining village in Scotland, according to my late father. And who am I to argue with him now that he’s long gone or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambuslang? And I’ve no intention of altering info on Wiki.

After reading about what the workers, at the Rolls Royce factory, had done to help the people of Chile and thwart the efforts of Pinochet, I felt all warm and proud that ordinary working men had played a significant part in altering the course of history.

If they could do it just by refusing to work on the planes, then why couldn’t we? What was to stop us – ordinary punters – from doing something similar when we encountered injustice?

For the most part, most of us tend to live quite ordinary lives. We rise and shine (sometimes not so much with the shining) and head about our daily responsibilities and, if we’re lucky, we get to relax and commend ourselves on another day well lived. We hope.

We fend for those we love; we feed and clothe them; we help educate them and form their characters. We’re busy. Busy loving and tending.

Then an opportunity comes along that we’re not looking for. Something we could do that might benefit someone else. Do we take it? Do we fit another thing into our busy lives? We’ve all been there. Sometimes we do it. What did it cost us, after all? A few minutes? A few pounds? Some hugs and a bit of extra love for someone not directly attached to our families?

Sometimes, we don’t.

And it’s the don’t part that bothers me. Or maybe it’s the don’t part that could make all the difference.

Over the period of time that we’ve been living this different life that the pandemic has forced on us, I guess a lot of people have had time to think about what constitutes a typical day. And how much of our time is taken up with repetition and grind.

We’ve all heard and read the urgings to return to work and get the wheels of the economy back on track. And, interestingly, those shouting loudest are those least likely to have to put themselves into any potential risk situation. But we do it anyway. What choice do we have? We have to eat, don’t we? We have to pay bills, for sure.

A helluva lot of huvtaes.

And, in the midst of it all, the world appears to be doing somersaults while we navigate the risks of the huvtaes.

In the space of a very short time, we’ve seen and read incredible things. The Black Lives Matter protests. The knock-on effects around the world. The fight for justice. I don’t know about elsewhere, but Scotland is having an ongoing argument that’s turning a bit nasty, at times, about gender recognition and the implications of it. The fight for equality.

Meanwhile, there are ‘leaders’ spouting forth on multiple subjects that they are not qualified to speak on while they ignore the advice from experts because, you know, what do experts know? The incessant lies from these so-called leaders have also given rise to a growing awareness of how little they are qualified for their roles and how much the decisions they take are based, not on the good of the people they profess to govern, but on the marketplace that so many of them are heavily involved in.

I, for one, am sick of being a cog in the machine. Fucking sick of it.

I’ve loved my job. I’ve done it, to the best of my ability, for over thirty years and, in the not too distant future, I’ll retire from it. I won’t entirely give up the role. I’ll do supply work when needed and I know I’ll miss it for so many reasons.

The main reason I’ll miss it though is because I’ve always worked. Since I was 13. Yes, 13. I had a job in a café when I was 13. Fifty pence an hour was what I earned. That’s about 25 cents, I think. Although exchange rates are a volatile business, at the best of times, so who knows?

Let me list the places I have worked.

After the café, I had a job in a small grocery shop, a stint in Woolworths – loved that job! – a pub-come-function suite that catered for special occasions. I wasn’t even legal to do so at the time, being under 18, but the owner didn’t ask and I never thought about it. My birthday was only a few months anyway, so who cares, eh?

I worked in a variety of other pubs, one I even worked in twice after I packed it in and returned a few months later. In between times, I had gone to work in a disco on a Greek island where I wasn’t paid if no customers came in. That happened one night. But my drinks were free so I figure I won that night. Dance floor to myself too. The moves! Helluva hangover the next morning though.

During my three years at college I spent each summer working on the same Greek island. I did some chambermaiding. Euch! Do you know what they did with used toilet paper back then? Those bins were not pleasant to empty. But, hey, I was living the dream. After I was robbed, by a fellow Scot – bastard – I also worked, during the day, in a restaurant, making souvlaki and Greek salads, peeling spuds and chipping them to later serve them to holidaymakers at night. Didn’t see so much sun at that point. Or people. Or places. Not quite living the dream.

I worked in a biscuit factory on the outskirts of Athens where, I, unfortunately, gummed up one of the conveyor belts with a tea towel. The biscuits were hot! Only stopped production briefly, so that was okay. Turned out I was going too fast. At least, that was what my developing Greek picked up. ‘Look at that wee Scots lassie go!’ would be the rough translation.

When I graduated college. I applied for a job in Athens and taught 5-18 year olds how to speak English. Most of them were lovely. Some of them were cheeky bastards. Same as here. The joy of not letting on that I could now understand what they were saying then answering them in Greek was precious. Works in Scottish schools too. Swearing in Greek is the best. Facing the board, obviously. I’m not stupid.

When my contract was up there, and while I was trying to decide whether or not to stay on, I had to find other work.

I looked after a Doberman Pinscher that mauled me. He was a bastard too. The woman that employed me was a bitch. American she was. Worked for Citibank. It was a live-in job and I had to shop to a budget – producing receipts, of course – cook and clean while, in between, walking the beast from hell. And sewing the trousers of random strangers it attacked on the beach.

I gave it three weeks. Enough time to gather money to pay my rent and utilities. Then I worked in a bar in Athens. I loved that job too. The craic was great. That was where I first heard Men At Work – ‘Do You Come From A Land Down Under?’ Gawd, I heard it recently and I was cast back in time in seconds.

Umm, what else?

Oh yeah. When I came back home, I started training to be a nurse because there were no teaching jobs to be had – one of the reasons I had gone to teach in Athens, in the first place. I went to college and did my first stint on a medical ward. The most tiring job I’ve ever had in my life. Used to fall asleep with my clothes on as soon as I got home.

Then I was offered a teaching job. Temporary one. What to do? I wanted to keep nursing but, word had it, that there was a shortage of nursing jobs upon graduation and I didn’t want that again. I took advice. ‘Get your foot in the door and there will be other teaching jobs’. So, I did.

Two years of temporary placements, between two separate schools, before being offered my first permanent teaching job. That was how they did it back then. Very different now. Very different.

I spent two years in that job, applied for a transfer the year I was getting married – 1987. Twenty-six and multiple jobs under my belt. And that’s without counting random waitressing jobs. I seem to remember working a restaurant shift at the greyhound racing one night. Transfers don’t happen now. Pity that. It was a great way of, essentially, moving between departments. Now, it’s all, annual interviews and promissory contracts, if successful, with the process repeated annually. Not interested.

Spent 14 years in that school. By the end, it felt a bit like I should get time off for good behaviour. I moved to another school and did only a year there because I was pregnant with my sixth child.

I resigned.

I figured this would be my last baby and I wanted to spend as much time as possible with her.

But, mainly, and I cannot stress this enough, I was heartbroken and couldn’t face returning. In my class, in that school, was a boy whose mother was a drug addict and prostitute. His father was in prison. He begged for food, with his two-year-old sister in tow, round the doors of the local area. I wanted to take him home. My husband thought I’d lost it. I had.

This kid was the original Harry Potter, at least in terms of where he slept. The first book had just come out and one of the kids had brought it to school and asked me to read it to the class. When I discovered that HP slept under the stairs and that, laterally, that’s where wee J was sleeping, at his aunt’s house, I was undone.

When no one appeared for him at a social work meeting that I had only found out about that day, I was finished. My mum was minding my kids while I was waiting for anyone – anyone – to show some interest in this one. Mobile phones weren’t a thing back then and the meeting started straight after school. I left my kids and my mum not knowing where the hell I was while I hoped for someone to show an interest in my wee waif.

He eventually went in to care which was probably for the best.

I resigned.

Three years later, after my then youngest started nursery, I applied to do supply work and figured occasional days would do. The Education Office had other ideas and asked me to go full-time doing what is called Area Cover. This involves going to whatever school, in a given area, needs cover, for whatever period of time necessary.

I’m still doing that thirteen years later.

Love it. The variety! The experience. The number of schools! I’ve lost count.

So, yeah, I think I’ve worked hard.

I think I’m due retirement.

I think that ‘leaders’ who cry, ‘Get back to work!’ know shit about the real world.

And I really think that, having had no experience of the real world, they should be banned from holding office until they know what the real world involves.

Experience and learning from it. Education and learning from it.

Not a background in how to make money from others’ efforts and a degree in how best to do that.

During lockdown, we haven’t stopped working. Technology is a wonderful thing. At times.

What it’s not so good for is giving these no-marks a platform to air their agendas.

Now, I’ve waffled on for ages here. Jeez, you should know me by now.

What I started to say – a long time ago – was that those guys in the factory in East Kilbride were guys just doing their jobs and they made a difference. By not doing them, as it turned out.

We have no idea of the impact we have on the lives of others and all we can do is do our best in whatever circumstances we find ourselves.

I have absolutely no interest in politics other than the fact that everything politicians do and say affects my life and the lives of those around us. Those we love.

Lockdown has been an education. An eye-opener. Things, already previously thought about, have crystallized.

The world is awaking to a new reality. And it’s not over yet. What do we do with that? What will be our part in the changing thoughts and feelings of those of us who have too long felt and recognised systemic injustices and party political manoeuvrings that exist to serve only those who may benefit from policies designed to keep us in our place?

Do we down tools like those Rolls Royce workers? Make a difference in the simple acts? The effective acts? Or do we do as we are told and suck it up?

I’m coming up on sixty. I’ve no idea how that happened. Really. I was 18 a wee while ago. I was full of hopes and dreams and doing whatever I could do live the dreams.

I’m still dreaming. Dreaming of what I can do after I retire.

For sure, hubs and I will explore more of this beautiful country we call home. For sure, we’ll be here, god willing, to continue to do what we can for the seven children we’ve been blessed with. Oh yeah, Anna appeared when I was 46. In between shifts.

Because life goes on. It goes on and on. And we have an impact on it. We do. Don’t let anyone tell you differently.

We can down tools.

I think an international strike may be in order.

A strike that says, ‘Fuck off! We’re not doing all this for you! We’re living for our families, for our neighbours, for our communities, for future generations, for all people – creed, colour, gender and religions, not an issue. We’re living. We’re dreaming. We’re here. And, so long as we’re the ones keeping the wheels of industry oiled, we demand better! We are not cogs in your machine to make you richer and more powerful. You are charlatans and thieves. You are liars and corrupt. You are what we are fighting against. Not each other. You!’

And then we change how the world works. We make it better. Fairer. Happier.

We look at outdated systems of governance. We redefine governance and we ensure that representation means just that. People. Real people. Experts. Ordinary folk. Workers. United.

We are one.

Nae fuckin’ pasaran tae would be fascists and dictators!

P.S. I started writing this tome because I read a post on Cole’s page about that arsehat in the US and a guy who, through personal experience, knows a cult when he sees one. We really need to be bigger and better than cultists and followers of whatever eejit happens to hold the reins of power because, as sure as fuck, very few of them are doing whatever they profess to do for us.

We can do anything we put our minds and backs to.

Or not.

P.P.S. I went back to Youtube to check out the name of the band and noticed this comment underneath. The only comment.

Πολυ ωραια μουσικη πολλες αληθειες

And I could still remember my Greek.

Very beautiful music, very true.

Dead chuffed.  Remembering is important.

7 thoughts on “Nae Fuckin’ Pasaran!”

  1. You have earned the retirement A-M – no doubt there. But teachers keep on teaching – and we need a real shift in education right now. Like RIGHT now. No more glossing over the bits that make us uncomfortable or do nothing more than shore up narratives that benefit only a portion of the population. Past time. PAST time. And as soon as we can travel again we will discuss plans to change the world over pints. xo

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I finish up tomorrow for the summer holidays so that will have to do for now but, even after retirement, the job doesn’t end. Education needs to be lifelong and it certainly needs changing if we’re still at the point of dismissing facts that don’t suit us. I’m looking forward to the day we meet again and putting the world to rights over a few jars. Take care. xx

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Well said Momus, it is our world and we should take it back.
    I think the first thing should be to stop buying any and all media that the big cats own, they are the biggest ‘pushers’ of lies and corruption, they only tell us what ‘they’ve’ decided to. No newspapers, magazines or anything to do with them…then watch the squirm begin. Just get everything off the internet. Just personally I have stopped all media purchases since February.
    And if they try to put new rules in place to block the internet like they are trying to do now, just stop buying another fat cats money making products too. And another and another until they get the message.
    They only ever respond when the hip pocket starts to lighten. So lets speak the only thing they listen to. They are most certainly not governing for the people 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are any number of papers I wouldn’t have in my house, Mark. There are still a number of journalists I admire and trust for their dedication to investigative journalism but oh so many that I am appalled by. Murdoch has his fingers in too many pies for anyone’s good but his own. It’s interesting, and laughable, seeing different headlines in the same paper depending on the market. The same is too often true for the TV news. I find myself searching out comparisons to gain perspective on anything written or said by the media.
      It’s hellish that media moguls have more of an ear of the politicians than the public do and that trust in both has been so badly eroded.
      There are quite a few papers here that are generally boycotted because of their partisan articles and editorials and they pretty much deserve to go out of business.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I just know that your retirement will be packed with activity – albeit at a pace you choose and not one imposed upon you. Love the job – even the shitty form filling that winds up being shredded; and yes, it can go from heart-wrenching to heart- warming (and back again) in an instant, but I don’t think I’d change a minute of it.
    After several weeks of Lockdown and the hope that the general consciousness would change (we’ve heard birds sing louder than ever, breathed fresher air and enjoyed the silence – I remember the noise of the first plane in ages to fly overhead which was almost deafening (ok I exaggerate a little, but it was a shock to the system – and anyway who’s aboard, and where the fuck can they be going?)) things sadly seem to be hurtling back towards what did pass as normal here. What will it take for us yo learn?
    And the powers that be have no more grip on reality than they ever did – should we be surprised?
    I married in 1987 too. Best thing I ever did.
    Take care
    Chris

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I noticed the quiet too, Chris, and loved it. The fact that we had such gorgeous weather a few weeks ago and the opportunity to enjoy the sun and the peace was joyous. When I had to go into school the roads were so quiet too and it reminded me of when I was so much younger and there were just generally fewer cars on the road. Like going back in time.
    It’s changed, of course, in recent weeks and most likely will get worse.
    We’ve been prepping for blended learning in school but an announcement today from John Swinney may see all the kids back come August, depending on how the next few weeks go. At the moment, I’m set to work with six kids on a rotational basis and seating measured out for social distancing. In many ways, it’s been harder working in the way we have over the last while – online learning and teaching/learning packs.
    I’ve always counted myself lucky that I’m in a job where I’m never bored (apart from the meetings!) It’s strange trying to teach kids without them being in front of you! So much of teaching and learning is in the classroom dynamic and interactions.
    We’ll see how things pan out for August.
    You don’t finish till later, I know – some point in July, I think?
    Despite all the time not in school, I’m sure you must be like me in looking forward to not having to think about it at all for a few weeks.
    I was due to head off to Portugal on Thursday with all of my family and their partners but that’s not happening, of course!
    1987 was a good year, Chris! 🙂
    You take care too and happy holidays when they come.

    Like

  5. All I can say is, wow! You deserve a break! I used to believe I was working toward a better future. Now, faced with catastrophes of Biblical proportions, I have no idea what will happen even next week, much less down the road. I thought I was building a body of talents, but now have no idea what they are and what use they are, either. To say America is filled with stupid people who have gone off the deep end, is to understate the problem here. It has been building since Goldwater days. We finally have a fascist party of low-IQers running things. I can’t believe the stories I wake up to every single morning. Add to that the process of aging and all that entails, and the pandemic, and I don’t know how I get through it. Anyway, I enjoyed this post. Gave me lots to ponder, Anne-Marie. Take care of yourself.

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